PVC Injection Moulding Processing Guide

Injection moulding is a popular method for manufacturing processes that use plastic materials. Polyvinyl Carbonate (PVC) is one of the most popular plastics used in manufacturing, and so PVC pellets are often manufactured using injection moulding methods. The method itself can seem highly technical and confusing, luckily at Let’s Recycle It we have a team of experts who can provide you with a PVC injection moulding processing guide to help break down the process into simpler terms.

PVC Processing


At Let’s Recycle It we work hard to make sure that the highest quality plastic materials are recycled and put back into manufacturing. This is part of our mission to push industries all over the world towards a circular economic model. PVC is one of the most popular plastic materials used in recycling, and so we take extra during PVC processing to ensure that only top-quality material is being given to our clients.

What is PVC used for?

Given how popular PVC is in manufacturing, it would be natural to wonder, ‘What is PVC used for?’ PVC is used in a wide variety of industries, such as construction, automotive, medical, clothing and upholstery. It is used for an even wider variety of products, such as clingfilm, shower curtains, credit cards, imitation leather, aprons, bags, shoes, waterproof clothing, greenhouses, inflatables, food containers, fencing, flooring, gutters, piping, cable insulation and window frames.

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HDPE / LDPE / PP Pellets

If you are looking for recycled plastic pellets for sale, then we can facilitate this. We can arrange the sale of the highest quality recycled pellets for you, from a manufacturer with industry leading expertise in recycling plastic into pellets. As well as this, if you are looking for information about recycled plastic pellets uses, then we are available to answer any questions you might have.

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Where Let's Recycle It Operates

Countries We Cover

We pride ourselves on delivering industry unrivalled customer service, exceeding our customers' expectations across all of the countries we work in.

Ireland

  • Ireland is Europe’s top producer of plastic waste per capita.
  • 95% of plastic waste was exported to China until the country banned imports of waste from foreign countries in January 2018, meaning Ireland faces pressure to find alternate waste disposal methods to help them reach their 2030 goals of an 80% increase in plastic recycling.
  • Ireland is placing a ban on single-use plastics coming into effect in 2021.

United Kingdom

  • United Kingdom produces 5 million tonnes of plastic waste annually.
  • UK set to introduce a plastic packaging tax of £200 per ton on packaging made of less than 30% recycled materials, which is expected to increase the use of recycled plastics in packaging by 40%.
  • UK aims for all plastic packaging on the market to be recyclable, reusable or compostable by 2025.

France

  • France produces 5 million tonnes of plastic waste annually.
  • France ranks among Europe’s poorest performers in plastic recycling with a rate well below the European average, due to their insufficient domestic recycling capacity.
  • France introduced a total ban on single use plastics to come into full effect in 2040 and began taking steps towards this in January 2020.

Belgium

  • Belgium produces 610,000 tonnes of plastic waste annually.
  • Belgium is one of the most efficient recyclers of plastic waste in Europe, recycling over 80% of their used plastic.
  • Belgium is introducing a series of bans on single use plastics, which began with the ban of single use plastics at public events in Brussels.

Germany

  • Germany produces 6.5 million tonnes of plastic waste annually.
  • Germany has been famously known as the plastic recycling hub of Europe.
  • They use ‘The Green Dot System’ whereby manufacturers and retailers must pay for a green dot on products. The more packaging they use, the higher the cost. 
  • Thanks to a low energy PET plastic (polyethylene terephthalate) recycling line at its plant in Rostock, Northern Germany, Veolia gives post-consumer plastic bottles a second life in a "bottle-to-bottle" cycle. One billion bottles per annum are recycled for further food use!

Poland

  • Poland produces 3.4 million tonnes of plastic waste annually.
  • Plastics processing is the biggest and most rapidly growing sector within the Polish plastics industry.
  • Plastics processing in Poland accounts for 85% of the industry’s annual turnover; its main areas of processing include: plastic containers, bottles, packaging, pipes, automotive parts.

Hungary

  • Hungary produces 740,000 tonnes of plastic waste annually.
  • Hungary is one of the three worst offenders for meeting EU plastic waste recycling targets.
  • Hungary is taking a number of steps to increase their plastic recycling to meet EU targets; they are introducing a single-use plastic ban in 2021 and will also introduce a tax on various other plastic items, such as straws, cups and plates.

Romania

  • Romania recycles only 14% of its waste, while upwards of 70% of the waste produced is sent to landfill.
  • Romania has failed to increase the percentage of the waste it recycles since 2010 and will miss the EU 2020 targets.
  • In 2018, Romania was found guilty by the EU Court of Justice for failing to close and empty 68 landfill sites that were deemed to pose environmental and health hazards.
  • Romania is applying for EU grants to help them invest in waste processing technology as an alternative to landfill.

Slovakia

  • Slovakia recycles only 23% of its waste, while upwards of 65% of the waste produced is sent to landfill. 
  • Slovakia will introduce a total ban on single-use plastics in January 2021; it will be illegal to sell plastic straws, cutlery, plates etc.
  • This ban is part of Slovakia’s efforts to make a shift towards using biodegradable packing materials.

Italy

  • Italy produces 2.2 million tonnes of plastic waste annually.
  • A report by the Italian Institute for Environmental Protection and Research in October 2019 found that more than 500,000 tonnes of plastic waste from Italy ends up in the Mediterranean Sea.
  • Italy has steadily increased the amount of plastic it recycles since 2013, and the country is set to introduce a tax on plastic packaging in the summer of 2020.

Turkey

  • Turkey produces 3.5 million tonnes of plastic wate annually.
  • Turkey has become one of the largest importers of plastic waste as the US and Europe send more waste there since China began to close its doors to overseas recyclables, with an increase in the amount of imported plastic in Turkey of around 200% since 2016.
  • Turkey’s Zero Waste Project, which began in December 2018, introduced several measures to reduce plastic consumption: for example, fees for plastic carrier bags and deposits for plastic drinking bottles.

India

  • India produces 10 million tonnes of plastic waste annually, with around 4 million tonnes of it going uncollected.
  • India is covered in illegal landfill sites that each cover several acres of land and hold thousands of tons plastic waste piled up several metres high, and is one of the world’s worst contributors to plastic pollution in rivers and oceans
  • India introduced the Plastic Waste Management Rules in 2016, and amended them in 2018, to legislate for local authorities to be held responsible for setting up their own recycling infrastructure and for corporate responsibility on manufacturers for collecting the waste their products produce.

Pakistan

  • Pakistan produces 6.5 million tonnes of plastic waste annually.
  • Pakistan’s plastic industry has been growing at a staggering rate of 15% per year in Pakistan, which has led to the government introducing their plan of action to move towards a circular economy and achieve the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals for 2030.
  • Pakistan is investing in its infrastructure to increase its capacity to collect and process plastic waste, especially PET single use drinking bottles.
  • Regional bans have already been placed on the use of these PET single use bottles as they are one of the worst offending items contributing to Pakistan’s plastic pollution problem.

Sweden

  • Sweden produces 300,000 tonnes of plastic waste annually.
  • Sweden is one of the world leaders in recycling, having gone further than most other countries in moving towards a circular economy.
  • Only 1% of Sweden’s annual waste goes to landfill; most of the waste is either recycled and sent back into manufacturing or is burned in low-carbon incinerators to produce energy to power anything from buses to apartment buildings.

Norway

  • Norway is one of the world leaders in the recycling of plastic waste.
  • Norway’s plastic drinking bottle recycling programme recycles over 97% of plastic bottles, with fewer than 1% going to landfill.
  • The quality of the recycled plastic drinking bottle material is so high that 92% of bottles are used to make more bottles; the material has been reused to make new drinking bottle dozens of times in some cases.
  • Norway is among the nations that send the least amount of waste to landfill; most of the waste in Norway is either recycled or burned in low-carbon incinerators to produce energy to power anything from buses to apartment buildings.

Finland

  • Finland produces 380,000 tonnes of plastic waste every year.
  • Finland, particularly in its cities, experienced its largest increase in the amount of plastic it recycled in 2019; in some areas recycling increased by 180% compared to 2018.
  • Many housing companies in Finland have been joining the new eco-initiative to increase the amount of waste that is recycled and reduce the amount going to landfill.

Portugal

  • Portugal produces 1 million tonnes of plastic waste annually.
  • Portugal introduced bans on several single-use plastic items from 2020, including carrier bags and cutlery.
  • Portugal is behind the EU’s recycling goals for 2020, but the country did recycle 10% more waste material in 2019 than it did compared to 2018.

Saudi Arabia

  • Saudi Arabia produces 2.5 million tonnes of plastic waste annually.
  • Saudi Arabia introduced new regulations for plastic in December 2017, with the second phase coming into effect in 2020, with the use of plastic being banned for several single-use products.
  • Saudi Arabia is investing in new state of the art recycling facilities to mitigate the increasing demand they are set to face; with the rapidly increasing rates of population growth and urbanisation, the amount of waste Saudi Arabia produces is forecast to double by 2033.
United Kingdom

United Kingdom

  • United Kingdom produces 5 million tonnes of plastic waste annually.
  • UK set to introduce a plastic packaging tax of £200 per ton on packaging made of less than 30% recycled materials, which is expected to increase the use of recycled plastics in packaging by 40%.
  • UK aims for all plastic packaging on the market to be recyclable, reusable or compostable by 2025.

Read more about the UK

Belgium

Belgium

  • Belgium produces 610,000 tonnes of plastic waste annually.
  • Belgium is one of the most efficient recyclers of plastic waste in Europe, recycling over 80% of their used plastic.
  • Belgium is introducing a series of bans on single use plastics, which began with the ban of single use plastics at public events in Brussels.

Read more about Belgium

Finland

Finland

  • Finland produces 380,000 tonnes of plastic waste every year.
  • Finland, particularly in its cities, experienced its largest increase in the amount of plastic it recycled in 2019; in some areas recycling increased by 180% compared to 2018.
  • Many housing companies in Finland have been joining the new eco-initiative to increase the amount of waste that is recycled and reduce the amount going to landfill.

Read more about Finland

France

France

  • France produces 5 million tonnes of plastic waste annually.
  • France ranks among Europe’s poorest performers in plastic recycling with a rate well below the European average, due to their insufficient domestic recycling capacity.
  • France introduced a total ban on single use plastics to come into full effect in 2040 and began taking steps towards this in January 2020.

Read more about France

Germany

Germany

  • Germany produces 6.5 million tonnes of plastic waste annually.
  • Germany has been famously known as the plastic recycling hub of Europe.
  • They use ‘The Green Dot System’ whereby manufacturers and retailers must pay for a green dot on products. The more packaging they use, the higher the cost. 
  • Thanks to a low energy PET plastic (polyethylene terephthalate) recycling line at its plant in Rostock, Northern Germany, Veolia gives post-consumer plastic bottles a second life in a "bottle-to-bottle" cycle. One billion bottles per annum are recycled for further food use!

Read more about Germany

Hungary

Hungary

  • Hungary produces 740,000 tonnes of plastic waste annually.
  • Hungary is one of the three worst offenders for meeting EU plastic waste recycling targets.
  • Hungary is taking a number of steps to increase their plastic recycling to meet EU targets; they are introducing a single-use plastic ban in 2021 and will also introduce a tax on various other plastic items, such as straws, cups and plates.

Read more about Hungary

India

India

  • India produces 10 million tonnes of plastic waste annually, with around 4 million tonnes of it going uncollected.
  • India is covered in illegal landfill sites that each cover several acres of land and hold thousands of tons plastic waste piled up several metres high, and is one of the world’s worst contributors to plastic pollution in rivers and oceans
  • India introduced the Plastic Waste Management Rules in 2016, and amended them in 2018, to legislate for local authorities to be held responsible for setting up their own recycling infrastructure and for corporate responsibility on manufacturers for collecting the waste their products produce.

Read more about India

Ireland

Ireland

  • Ireland is Europe’s top producer of plastic waste per capita.
  • 95% of plastic waste was exported to China until the country banned imports of waste from foreign countries in January 2018, meaning Ireland faces pressure to find alternate waste disposal methods to help them reach their 2030 goals of an 80% increase in plastic recycling.
  • Ireland is placing a ban on single-use plastics coming into effect in 2021.

Read more about Ireland

Italy

Italy

  • Italy produces 2.2 million tonnes of plastic waste annually.
  • A report by the Italian Institute for Environmental Protection and Research in October 2019 found that more than 500,000 tonnes of plastic waste from Italy ends up in the Mediterranean Sea.
  • Italy has steadily increased the amount of plastic it recycles since 2013, and the country is set to introduce a tax on plastic packaging in the summer of 2020.

Read more about Italy

Norway

Norway

  • Norway is one of the world leaders in the recycling of plastic waste.
  • Norway’s plastic drinking bottle recycling programme recycles over 97% of plastic bottles, with fewer than 1% going to landfill.
  • The quality of the recycled plastic drinking bottle material is so high that 92% of bottles are used to make more bottles; the material has been reused to make new drinking bottle dozens of times in some cases.
  • Norway is among the nations that send the least amount of waste to landfill; most of the waste in Norway is either recycled or burned in low-carbon incinerators to produce energy to power anything from buses to apartment buildings.

Read more about Norway

Pakistan

Pakistan

  • Pakistan produces 6.5 million tonnes of plastic waste annually.
  • Pakistan’s plastic industry has been growing at a staggering rate of 15% per year in Pakistan, which has led to the government introducing their plan of action to move towards a circular economy and achieve the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals for 2030.
  • Pakistan is investing in its infrastructure to increase its capacity to collect and process plastic waste, especially PET single use drinking bottles.
  • Regional bans have already been placed on the use of these PET single use bottles as they are one of the worst offending items contributing to Pakistan’s plastic pollution problem.

Read more about Pakistan

Poland

Poland

  • Poland produces 3.4 million tonnes of plastic waste annually.
  • Plastics processing is the biggest and most rapidly growing sector within the Polish plastics industry.
  • Plastics processing in Poland accounts for 85% of the industry’s annual turnover; its main areas of processing include: plastic containers, bottles, packaging, pipes, automotive parts.

Read more about Poland

Portugal

Portugal

  • Portugal produces 1 million tonnes of plastic waste annually.
  • Portugal introduced bans on several single-use plastic items from 2020, including carrier bags and cutlery.
  • Portugal is behind the EU’s recycling goals for 2020, but the country did recycle 10% more waste material in 2019 than it did compared to 2018.

Read more about Portugal

Romanian

Romania

  • Romania recycles only 14% of its waste, while upwards of 70% of the waste produced is sent to landfill.
  • Romania has failed to increase the percentage of the waste it recycles since 2010 and will miss the EU 2020 targets.
  • In 2018, Romania was found guilty by the EU Court of Justice for failing to close and empty 68 landfill sites that were deemed to pose environmental and health hazards.
  • Romania is applying for EU grants to help them invest in waste processing technology as an alternative to landfill.

Read more about Romania

Saudi Arabia

Saudi Arabia

  • Saudi Arabia produces 2.5 million tonnes of plastic waste annually.
  • Saudi Arabia introduced new regulations for plastic in December 2017, with the second phase coming into effect in 2020, with the use of plastic being banned for several single-use products.
  • Saudi Arabia is investing in new state of the art recycling facilities to mitigate the increasing demand they are set to face; with the rapidly increasing rates of population growth and urbanisation, the amount of waste Saudi Arabia produces is forecast to double by 2033.

Read more about Saudi Arabia

Slovakia

Slovakia

  • Slovakia recycles only 23% of its waste, while upwards of 65% of the waste produced is sent to landfill. 
  • Slovakia will introduce a total ban on single-use plastics in January 2021; it will be illegal to sell plastic straws, cutlery, plates etc.
  • This ban is part of Slovakia’s efforts to make a shift towards using biodegradable packing materials.

Read more about Slovakia

Sweden

Sweden

  • Sweden produces 300,000 tonnes of plastic waste annually.
  • Sweden is one of the world leaders in recycling, having gone further than most other countries in moving towards a circular economy.
  • Only 1% of Sweden’s annual waste goes to landfill; most of the waste is either recycled and sent back into manufacturing or is burned in low-carbon incinerators to produce energy to power anything from buses to apartment buildings.

Read more about Sweden

Turkey

Turkey

  • Turkey produces 3.5 million tonnes of plastic wate annually.
  • Turkey has become one of the largest importers of plastic waste as the US and Europe send more waste there since China began to close its doors to overseas recyclables, with an increase in the amount of imported plastic in Turkey of around 200% since 2016.
  • Turkey’s Zero Waste Project, which began in December 2018, introduced several measures to reduce plastic consumption: for example, fees for plastic carrier bags and deposits for plastic drinking bottles.

Read more about Turkey

Frequently Asked Questions

What plastics are recyclable?

The vast majority of plastics can be recycled; rather than the material itself, it is usually a logistical, technical or economic issue that prevents plastic from being recycled. If plastics are contaminated, if there is not ready access to a recycling facility or if the cost of recycling the plastic is too high to make a profit when selling the recycled product are examples of issues that may lead to plastic not being recycled.

Can plastics be recycled?

Yes, plastics can be recycled. Whether you’re a business owner wondering if they can recycle their plastic scrap, or if you’re wondering whether you can recycle the plastic you have lying around at home then the answer remains yes. How you go about recycling your plastic may vary depending on where and who you are. If you’re wondering about the plastic you have at home, your local authority will be able to inform you how you should go about recycling your household waste. If you are a business owner, get in touch with Let’s Recycle It today to find out how we can help you recycle your plastic waste by buying it from you.

Why should we recycle plastic?

Firstly, you should recycle plastic because of the enormous toll plastic is taking on the environment; whether it’s manufacturing new plastic or plastic pollution in our oceans, the way we use this material needs to be addressed as a matter of great urgency. Secondly, the EU, the UN and governing bodies all around the world are taking steps to shift industry towards a circular economy. The amount of plastic that gets recycled needs to increase in order for countries to increase to meet their set manufacturing targets.

How to recycle plastic waste?

If you are recycling plastic you have at home, making sure it is sorted and cleaned before putting it in your recycling bins will help workers at waste handling facilities process the plastic for recycling. If you are a business owner, making sure you keep your plastic clean and in good condition is important for recycling the material. Contact us at Let’s Recycle It for more information on how we can help you with this – we buy plastic scrap.

How to get recycled plastic?

If you are looking to buy recycled plastic for manufacturing or another use, then contact Let’s Recycle It today. We have the highest quality recycled plastic EREMA pellet for sale.

What can we do to recycle plastic?

How to go about recycling plastic can vary on a number of factors; if you’re trying to recycle food or mail packaging, old unwanted plastic products or anything else plastic then ensure that the material is clean, remove contaminating materials and recycle in accordance with your local authority’s requirements. If you are a business owner, then make sure to keep your plastics clean, separated out into the different materials and in good condition then contact Let’s Recycle It about how we can help you recycle your waste – we buy plastic scrap.

What is plastic scrap?

Plastic scrap can take many forms. It can be empty food packaging, product packaging, packaging materials from shipments, old car parts, household items or industry waste such as film, polystyrene and piping. Anything made from plastic becomes waste as soon as it is no longer wanted, needed or fit for purpose. Contact Let’s Recycle It today to find out how we can help you recycle this material – we buy plastic scrap.

How to process recycled plastic?

Recycling companies will acquire plastic waste from a variety of sources and then send it on for processing. The material will be sorted, cleansed, shredded and melted into plastic pellet to go back into manufacturing.

How do plastic recycling plants work?

Plastic recycling plants will receive deliveries of plastic waste from recycling companies. The workers at these facilities will then take the loads and sort through the materials to ensure they are as appropriately segregated as possible before the plastic is sent on to be cleansed. Once clean, the plastic will be shredded into small flakes before finally being melted down to form a pellet that can then be used by manufacturers.

Who buys recycled plastic?

Here at Let’s Recycle It, we are interested in buying plastic scrap of all types and grades. If you have plastic waste, get in touch today to find out if and how we can go about buying your scrap material.

How to make recycled plastic pellets from recycled plastic?

Once plastic has been sent for recycling, a recycling plant will segregate and clean the material, shred it and then melt it down to form a plastic pellet that can be used in manufacturing. At Let’s Recycle It we have the highest quality EREMA recycled plastic pellet for sale, get in touch for more information.

Which companies recycling?

Here at Let’s Recycle It, recycle is our middle name. We are industry leaders in the recycling of various different polymers. We have a dedicated team of experts ready and waiting to help you with all of your recycling needs. So get in touch today to find out more about the services we have to offer – we buy plastic scrap.